Titan Freight Adds 3 All-Electric Box Trucks for Short-Haul Deliveries in Northwestern US

Jan. 4, 2024
Over the course of their service lives, the company expects the cost of ownership for the 291 kWh electric trucks to be approximately 29% less than that of their diesel counterparts

Titan Freight Systems has added three all-electric box trucks to its short-haul delivery fleet to help achieve zero-emission deliveries across the Northwest United States, including Oregon, Washington, and Northern Idaho.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, 30% of greenhouse gas emissions can be directly linked to the transportation sector, contributing to global carbon dioxide levels and warming temperatures.

“The really good thing about these short-haul trucks is 80% of all products move 300 miles or less, so these local trucks have tremendous upside potential, almost overnight, because the vast majority of units we have are short-haul,” said Keith Wilson, CEO of Titan Freight Systems.

Daimler, a commercial vehicle manufacturer under the Mercedes-Benz umbrella, supplied the three 291 kWh medium-duty electric trucks to the company. Each truck provides a typical range of up to 250 miles on a single charge and can achieve an 80% charge within 60 minutes.

“They’re operationally efficient, their uptime has been solid, the driver likeability of the vehicles is strong, the emissions reductions in our workplace are all favorable. We’ve had a really good experience with this transition,” added Wilson.

Daimler also provided additional services for vehicle implementation, such as installing upgraded electric service and chargers.

In total, Titan Freight Systems invested nearly $1 million, half of which was covered through a service agreement with power utility company Portland General Electric. Titan is also planning to utilize state and federal incentives to help cover some of the remaining costs.

Over the course of their service lives, the company expects the cost of ownership for the electric trucks to be approximately 29% less than that of their diesel counterparts.