Siemens Energy and Georgia Tech partner to develop Sustainable H2 and Clean Energy solutions

Dec. 6, 2022
The first project under the partnership will focus on developing solutions that enable the flexible use of hydrogen fuels and help cut the carbon footprint of other energy sources

Siemens Energy has signed an agreement with the Georgia Institute of Technology to work together on the development of sustainable energy technology solutions such as green hydrogen.

The agreement, signed at the energy firm’s Innovation Center-Orlando, will allow the two companies to conduct joint research projects, while also supporting each other’s independent research and development work.

The first project under the partnership will focus on developing solutions that enable the flexible use of hydrogen fuels and help cut the carbon footprint of other energy sources. The future joint efforts may focus on government-funded projects, mainly those related to hydrogen.

Additionally, the agreement will allow the energy firm to effectively serve as an industrial advisory board member for the institute’s research efforts. It will also enable Georgia Tech to perform contract work in support of research projects spearheaded by Siemens Energy.

“At Siemens Energy, we always say that when it comes to enabling the energy transition, we can’t do it alone,” said Rich Voorberg, president of Siemens Energy North America. “Georgia Tech is one of the leading research institutions in this country, and we are proud to continue to build on our strong relationship to deliver innovative solutions in support of clean, reliable, economically viable energy systems.”

Hydrogen does not contain a carbon atom and thus does not emit CO2 when combusted. It is not abundantly or easily available, and thus must be generated via carbon-intensive steam reforming of methane gas or by electrolysis using electricity to separate the H2 from water.

To be considered truly green hydrogen, the electrolyzers must powered by carbon-free resources such as solar, wind, nuclear and/or hydropower.

Hydrogen also can deliver energy for transportation via fuel-cell technology, which uses a chemical and oxidation process to convert the H2 into electricity for vehicles.

“We are beyond excited to enter into this important partnership with Siemens Energy,” said Tim Lieuwen, Professor and Executive Director for the Strategic Energy Institute at Georgia Tech. “Siemens Energy will enable us to make good on our mission to integrates energy activities across the nation's largest technology university – from generation, to distribution, to use.”

Georgia Tech overall conducts more than $1 billion worth of research annually in many industrial sectors. Some of those included microgrid, fuel cell and renewable energy projects.

The university has many projects under way at its Power Lab (pictured).