Trane Technologies Participating in DOE Challenge to Develop and Increase Efficiency of Next-Generation Heat Pump Rooftop Units

May 10, 2024
The US spends nearly $800 billion annually to power buildings, manufacturing plants, and homes, and approximately 30% of the nation's energy is wasted, presenting an opportunity to increase efficiency

Trane Technologies is participating in the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Commercial Building Heat Pump Technology Challenge, designed to advance the adoption of cost-effective, next-generation heat pump rooftop units and cut carbon emissions. 

Heat pump rooftop units can reduce greenhouse gas emissions and energy costs by up to 50% compared to conventional rooftop units using natural gas heating.

Trane Technologies will leverage its expertise to develop new low-emissions heat pump rooftop units while partnering with the DOE and its national laboratories to create prototypes, test product performance and durability, and conduct field trials. The heat pumps will be designed to help organizations meet their energy efficiency requirements and decarbonization goals, supporting the Challenge’s advanced technology specifications.

According to the DOE, the US spends nearly $800 billion annually to power buildings, manufacturing plants, and homes, and approximately 30% of the nation's energy is wasted, presenting an opportunity to increase efficiency. 

The Challenge aims to market more efficient and affordable rooftop heat pump technologies by 2027. If deployed at scale, American businesses and commercial entities are anticipated to save $5 billion annually on utility bills.

“As the urgent need for clean technologies in addressing climate change becomes increasingly clear, we are proud to partner with the DOE in transforming the way the world heats and cools buildings while dramatically reducing energy use and carbon emissions in the process,” said Holly Paeper, President of Commercial HVAC Americas at Trane Technologies. 

Trane Technologies also participated in the DOE’s Residential Cold Climate Heat Pump Challenge. The company’s Trane prototype performed at -23°F, compared to the mandatory -20°F DOE requirement. 

Trane’s prototype continues to run in extremely cold temperatures for improved comfort and, after two years of field trials, delivers approximately 15% energy savings to homeowners.

As part of its 2030 sustainability commitments, Trane Technologies will participate in the Gigaton Challenge to reduce customer emissions by a billion metric tons and achieve its goal of reaching net-zero carbon emissions by 2050.