774-ft Container Ship bunkered with 300K gallons of LNG for West Coast routes

Sept. 8, 2022
The new MV George III was bunkered with LNG and the first container ship to do so there at the Port of Long Beach, according to supplier Clean Energy Fuels Corp. The company worked with World Fuel Services and West Coast Clean Fuels to supply the vessel

Pasha Hawaii is putting its first liquified natural gas-fueled container ship into operation after LNG was supplied to the vessel at a U.S. West Coast port.

The new MV George III was bunkered with LNG and the first container ship to do so there at the Port of Long Beach, according to supplier Clean Energy Fuels Corp. The company worked with World Fuel Services and West Coast Clean Fuels to supply the MV George III with more than 300,000 gallons of LNG fuel, lower emitting than diesel.

“The air quality around the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles is some of the worst in the country because of in large part the very dirty marine fuels that have been traditionally used by container ships,” said Andrew J. Littlefair, president and CEO, Clean Energy. “The move by Pasha to add ships that operate on clean-burning LNG is one the most forward-thinking and environmentally progressive actions taken in the maritime industry. We congratulate Pasha on their first successful bunkering operation and look forward to many more as Pasha continues to add the other LNG-powered ships to their fleet.”

The 774-foot MV George III operates routes between Long Beach and Oakland, California and Honolulu. It is the first of three LNG-powered ships that Pasha Hawaii plans to put into service.

Altogether, the three vessels are forecast to consume about 105 million gallons of LNG fuel over the next five years. The U.S. is now the world’s largest exporter of LNG, in which U.S. natural gas is chilled to colder than minus 260 degrees F. to liquify it and make stable for shipping.

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Proponents say that LNG-powered ships reduce diesel particulate matter and sulfer oxide emissions by 99 percent, nitrogen oxide by 90 percent and a quarter less carbon dioxide compared to traditional shipping fuels.

The Clean Energy Fuels LNG is supplied from the company’s plant in Boron, Calif. The facility will be expanded 50 percent when a third liquefaction-production train is completed in the near future, according to reports.

The MV George III is scheduled to bunker every second week at the Port of Long Beach. The second Pasha ship to operate on LNG, the Janet Marie, is expected to go into service in late 2022. The third Pasha ship is expected to be deployed in mid-2023.

A new report by the federal Energy Information Administration says that addition of three new major LNG terminal projects on the Gulf Coast should bring total U.S. LNG export capacity to nearly 17 billion cubic feet per day (bcf/d) over the next few years. Much of this product at these export facilities, which chill U.S. natural gas to liquify and make it stable for shipping, will go to customers in Europe, Asia and Africa.

The projects under construction are the Golden Pass, Plaquemines and Corpus Christi Stage III terminals. Altogether, they would add 5.7 bcf/d by 2025, according to the EIA.

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(Rod Walton, senior editor for EnergyTech, is a 14-year veteran of covering the energy industry both as a newspaper and trade journalist. He can be reached at [email protected]).

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