Black & Veatch to work on new Amp Americas on-farm dairy RNG project

May 20, 2022
Anaerobic digestion will be used to convert cow manure into RNG, which can be marketed as carbon-negative fuel to fleet customers. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says methane is 25 times more potent at trapping heat in the atmosphere than CO2

Engineering and construction firm Black & Veatch has partnered with on-farm dairy renewable natural gas  projects developer Amp Americas to develop a new facility in Lafayette County, Wisconsin.

Anaerobic digestion will be used to convert cow manure into RNG, which can be marketed as carbon-negative fuel to fleet customers.

“We chose Black & Veatch as our EPC partner for the Lafayette County facility because their experience in developing decarbonization solutions for industrial facilities aligns perfectly with our sustainable vision,” said Martin Gilkes, chief operating officer at Amp Americas. “Their expertise directly supports our efforts to harvest energy from waste materials, accelerating the global transition to renewable fuels.”

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says methane is 25 times more potent at trapping heat in the atmosphere than CO2. The International Energy Agency estimates that the global methane emissions are approximately 570 million tons annually.

“As the nation continues to work toward its 2050 decarbonization target, curbing GHG emissions from waste materials and creating new sources of low- and zero-carbon renewable fuels will be absolutely imperative,” said Doug Miller, vice president and managing director of fuels for Black & Veatch. “We are excited to be part of the team for this project, and to design and supply innovative solutions that will support Amp Americas as they pursue their goals. We look forward to our partnership together as additional waste-to-RNG facilities are developed.”

Amp Americas develops, owns and operates on-farm dairy RNG projects. Black & Veatch will leverage its engineering, procurement and construction management expertise to develop the new site.